Warning: include(): http:// wrapper is disabled in the server configuration by allow_url_include=0 in /home/content/73/7998873/html/prompt-pr.com/wordpress/wp-content/themes/prompt_theme_2012/category-news.php on line 14

Warning: include(http://www.prompt-logic.com/prompt/include/top_and_sky.php): failed to open stream: no suitable wrapper could be found in /home/content/73/7998873/html/prompt-pr.com/wordpress/wp-content/themes/prompt_theme_2012/category-news.php on line 14

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'http://www.prompt-logic.com/prompt/include/top_and_sky.php' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/local/php5_6/lib/php') in /home/content/73/7998873/html/prompt-pr.com/wordpress/wp-content/themes/prompt_theme_2012/category-news.php on line 14

Warning: include(): http:// wrapper is disabled in the server configuration by allow_url_include=0 in /home/content/73/7998873/html/prompt-pr.com/wordpress/wp-content/themes/prompt_theme_2012/category-news.php on line 15

Warning: include(http://www.prompt-logic.com/prompt/include/menu2.php): failed to open stream: no suitable wrapper could be found in /home/content/73/7998873/html/prompt-pr.com/wordpress/wp-content/themes/prompt_theme_2012/category-news.php on line 15

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'http://www.prompt-logic.com/prompt/include/menu2.php' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/local/php5_6/lib/php') in /home/content/73/7998873/html/prompt-pr.com/wordpress/wp-content/themes/prompt_theme_2012/category-news.php on line 15

 

Go to blog home page

By

May 13th, 2016

Crowdfunding scientific research: Interview with Experiment

Crowdfunding scientific research: Interview with Experiment

“Our mission is to create a world where anyone can be a scientist”

Crowdfunding scientific research: Interview with Experiment

Cindy Wu, co-founder, Experiment

We interviewed Cindy Wu, co-founder of Experiment, a platform for discovering, funding and sharing science. With one of the coolest mission statements we’ve heard: “to create a world where anyone can be a scientist”, Experiment enables scientists of every professional level to fund research – accelerating scientific discoveries through collaboration and information-sharing.  Cindy answered some questions about Experiment and shared some of her thoughts on crowdfunding.

What sets Experiment apart from other crowdfunding platforms?

CW: “Experiment was built for science and scientists. This is a place on the internet for people to propose research projects and for people to fund research projects. The reward for backers is the process and result of the research project, so we don’t support tangible rewards. Our mission is to create a world where anyone can be a scientist.”

When did Experiment launch?  Can you share any insight into its creation – what need or gap did you see in the market?

CW: “We launched in April 2012. The vision to create Experiment started when I was 19 and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) awarded me a grant for young scientists who have no research experience. During the year that HHMI funded me, I worked on designing new immunotherapies by engineering immune cells. That summer, I also worked with a team of undergraduates to design a new anthrax therapeutic. Denny (Luan, co-founder of Experiment) and I published the research in a peer-reviewed journal and the army is now doing follow-up studies.

“After designing the new anthrax therapeutic, I discovered the drug could also be used as an antibiotic for generic infections. When I asked my professor where I could find $5-10K to test out my hypothesis, he told me: “the system doesn’t fund people like you.” The funders today are so conservative that they only fund the most obvious ideas– and certainly not ones from undergraduate students that don’t have a PhD.

“We initially built Experiment for ourselves, but quickly found that early stage funding for ideas was just as big of a problem for tenured faculty. The initial idea for Experiment was inspired by Denny’s involvement as a University of Washington campus leader for Kiva.org, building a Kiva for science.”

How would you advise individuals or entrepreneurs to select the crowdfunding platform that will serve them best, from such a crowded market of compelling options?

CW: “Do your research. Understand what types of projects each platforms support. There is a difference between funding platforms that support tangible rewards and platforms that don’t support tangible rewards. Understand if tangible rewards make sense for your project.

“During a crowdfunding campaign you want to make sure that you get all the data you need to be successful. Look for platforms that provide you with analytics. Who is visiting your site and from what sources? This should be in real-time. It is unlikely any of the larger platforms will do marketing for you, but you should look at how big their community is and what percentage are repeat donors.

“Many platforms have lots of one time donors that are very unlikely to donate to your project. Check on this beforehand so you set your expectations for how much your team will need to raise.

“If you are running a larger campaign you may want to contract a team to help you. When looking ask these teams for past examples of crowdfunding campaigns they’ve helped with and set clear expectations of what they would be responsible for.”

Can you give us an idea of a typical successful project idea for your crowdfunding platform?

CW: “Projects on Experiment are well-defined research projects. The project has a clear plan to try to answer a specific research question. An ideal project has a way to engage the backers in the science, but is not required. This is an ideal project: experiment.com/gmoexperiment

How important is the choice of platform for any given crowdfunding campaign or potential project?

CW: “It is important especially if you want to utilize the platform to keep your donors engaged until the end of the project. Delivery and engagement are just as important as raising the money if you want to keep a loyal community. Many less popular or newer platforms only do a good job of providing a payment platform for your project. Think about your project as a long term investment. If you are going to be sticking with this one platform to keep your donors updated and eventually share the final outcomes with your community you will want to choose wisely. Think about what you need for your community to be successful and research which platforms support your project best.”

What is the single thing that you find yourself repeating to first-time crowdfunders or wishing that people knew before they go live with a crowdfunding project?

CW: “Crowdfunding always starts with your friends and family. It is close to impossible for your project to be funded entirely by strangers on the internet. People have this misconception that people on the internet will just find the project and give. This rarely happens. Most traffic is self-directed or directed to the project page through some effort put in by the team. There are clear techniques that can be replicated for projects, but you must put in the work to get the return.”

What features, functions or services do you offer that sets you apart from other platforms? What are your fees?

CW: “We support research projects only. We also work well with academic institutions which are often hard to navigate. Scientists do not give tangible rewards in return for donations, scientists share the scientific research process through what we call ‘Lab Notes’ on Experiment. Scientist are able to use the Lab Notes forever for free to keep their community engaged and updated. We also have a Journal where scientists can publish their results for their community at experiment.com/journal. Each project also receives a digital object identifier (DOI number), so that other scientists can cite a specific project.  We take an 8% fee if a project is fully funded. Experiment is an all-or-nothing funding platform.”

 Check out Experiment at: www.experiment.com, read updates and news at http://blog.experiment.com/, follow Experiment  on Facebook and follow @lets_experiment on Twitter.

Some stats from Experiment*:

Amount pledged to date: $6,285,138

Researchers: 6,623     Live projects: 68     Lab notes published: 4,936

Backers: 26,727      Repeat backers: 1,482

Average pledge size: $162

Launched projects: 1,136     Funded projects: 481

*As of May 13, 2016

 

 

 

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Crowdfunding, Crowdfunding platforms | Comments Off on Crowdfunding scientific research: Interview with Experiment

 

By

May 10th, 2016

Is the all or nothing crowdfunding approach a good thing, or seriously flawed?

Is the all or nothing crowdfunding approach a good thing, or seriously flawed?

In previous posts we’ve covered the concept of all or nothing crowdfunding and shared several Kickstarter stats.

For some people, the combination of these two things can lead to the question: Is the ‘all or nothing’ crowdfunding approach a good thing, or seriously flawed?

It’s no secret that I’m a fan of Kickstarter, and seeing that Kickstarter’s only funding mechanism is ‘all or nothing’, you’d be right in guessing that I have no beef with it. But I understand why some people may interpret it as ‘unfair’ – that all that work and effort and even if you’re short by 50 cents then you walk away with nothing. Zero. Zip.

It’s a tough call for many first-time crowdfunders. The promise, and safety-net, of ‘keep what you get’ funding can be tempting. While the ‘nothing’ of all or nothing can be a real driver – both for those running the campaign and for its backers.

The crowdfunding ‘flavor’ that you pick really depends on the project you are launching and the audiences you want to connect with. But for certain types of projects there is evidence that suggests that ‘all or nothing’ can lead to a higher success rate.

In 2014 York University in Toronto and Université Lille Nord de France collaborated and analyzed tens of thousands of Indiegogo crowdfunding campaigns seeking to raise between $5,000 and $20,000 to compare the success of all or nothing campaigns compared to keep what you get (both of which can be run on Indiegogo). The findings? That if you’re after funding, then ‘all or nothing’ is the way to go.

The researchers found that 34 percent of the ‘all or nothing’ campaigns reached their funding goals compared to 17 percent for the ‘keep what you get’ campaigns. A statistic which I thought was interesting was the number of backers attracted, with an average of 188 backers attracted to ‘all or nothing’ campaigns, while the ‘keep what you get’ campaigns attracted an average of 73 backers.

So the conclusion – from this (yes, single) study would be that ‘all or nothing’ campaigns are statistically more successful. In the following posts we’ll look at some of the potential reasons. all or nothing crowdfunding approach

If you have a question about funding or crowdfunding that we may be able to help with, then sign up for a free advisory session to see if we can help you and share our experiences of crowdfunding campaigns.

Tags: ,
Posted in Crowdfunding | Comments Off on Is the all or nothing crowdfunding approach a good thing, or seriously flawed?

 

By

March 10th, 2016

Crowdfunding Campaign PR: An Interview with Mitch Rosenberg, KinderLab Robotics

Crowdfunding Campaign PR: An Interview with Mitch Rosenberg, KinderLab Robotics

Mitch Rosenberg is the CEO and co-founder of KinderLab Robotics – a Boston-based company that’s created a developmentally-appropriate robot kit, KIBO, to help teach programming concepts to four- to seven year olds.

KIBO was funded on Kickstarter. We worked with the KinderLab Robotics team on crowdfunding content, blog content, social media content and working with the press to secure briefings and coverage with The New York TimesForbesBoing BoingGizmag,BostInnoBoston Business Journal and more.

KinderLab Robotics continues to work with the team at Prompt to share its vision, growth and successes.

We sat down with CEO and co-founder Mitch Rosenberg to talk a bit about his experience. See what he had to say about us below.

Why did you work with Prompt?

Mitch Rosenberg: Well, I went to a lot of firms in the Boston area. When we founded our company, we knew we were going to get it moving via Kickstarter. I asked many of the firms that are well-known in the area if they would sign up to help us publicize that Kickstarter, and most of them said no.

In contrast, Prompt came up with a very effective and creative approach for publicizing our company and a very creative way of financing it so we could afford it even as an early startup.  Because Prompt was unique in its ability to provide support for Kickstarter, we felt that it was a great fit for us.

So, we chose Prompt because it demonstrated a results-based program that was specifically designed for crowdfunding-based campaigns. Prompt worked with us on our successful Kickstarter campaign, and gave us valuable advice about our target audiences, helped us work with the press and created excellent copywriting. The Prompt team has a strong process, works methodically, and delivers results.

What results have you seen from working with Prompt?

Mitch: Working with Prompt, we have been featured in articles in The New York Times (more than once), Forbes, The Huffington Post, and many other local and radio media outlets and we’re very happy with the results.

And in addition to the media side, the Prompt team was instrumental in creating a social media presence for us that resulted in a wide variety of inquiries and sales. In summary, the results have been both prolific and business meaningful for us. We’ve gotten a lot of business because of our marketing with Prompt.

What has your experience been working with Prompt?

Mitch: The process working with Prompt has been really professional and fun. We have regular meetings, Prompt supplies us with a dashboard of statistics of how the various projects that we’re working on are fairing and we’re really happy with both the tone and results of working with Prompt.

Would you recommend Prompt?

Mitch: We highly recommend Prompt – especially for young and fast growing startups. But also for any innovative companies looking to make their presence known in the marketplaces they’re doing business in.

Interested in ensuring your crowdfunding campaign’s success? Check out our Crowdfunding Success 60-Day Program which leads you step-by-step on how we set up, run, manage and publicize crowdfunding campaigns.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Crowdfunding, PR Practices | Comments Off on Crowdfunding Campaign PR: An Interview with Mitch Rosenberg, KinderLab Robotics

 

By

May 29th, 2015

New enrollment period now open: Launch your First Crowdfunding Campaign Success Blueprint Program

New enrollment period now open: Launch your First Crowdfunding Campaign Success Blueprint Program

If you are crowdfunding, it’s important to plan and execute it as a product launch to get maximum impact and drive business (and personal) success. Let us guide you, step-by-step, with our proven 15-part part system that has helped successful rewards- and donation-based crowdfunding campaigns to raise funds from $70,000 to $215,000.

This program contains everything you need in order to plan and run a crowdfunding campaign, including: ready-made content, templates, worksheets and resources. Topic covered include how to create a plan, hone your messaging, calculate financial goals, come up with engaging rewards, work with the press, create compelling content, identify key audiences, attract supporters – and transform them to customers and fans! These are key activities to not just support your crowdfunding, but to build your future business.

Click here for more details or email us at crowd@prompt-communications.com with any questions at all.

Next enrollment opens June 8 for the program starting June 15 2015.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Crowdfunding | Comments Off on New enrollment period now open: Launch your First Crowdfunding Campaign Success Blueprint Program

 

By

May 28th, 2015

Free online event: How to drive enterprise technology sales with PR

Free online event: How to drive enterprise technology sales with PR

Are your PR efforts leading to sales? Throughout June we’ll be hosting free online events for enterprise technology marketers and entrepreneurs that want to create more leads and sales. In a 50-minute, information-packed webinar we will detail practical ways and techniques to shift PR processes to link them closer to sales and generate leads.

Hosted by Hazel Butters, who has 17 years’ of experience in technology PR and sales, ‘How to drive enterprise technology sales with PR’ will cover:

  • How to define your value proposition to increase sales
  • The ‘sales-marketing’ gap, and how to close it
  • Ten myths relating to PR and sales – and ten things you can do immediately to increase PR’s impact on your sales

Please join us and find out ways to change your approach to PR processes and to link them closer to sales. Register at: http://bit.ly/tech-PR-sales.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Events, PR Practices | Comments Off on Free online event: How to drive enterprise technology sales with PR

 

By

May 20th, 2015

Myth #10: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #10: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #10

“The sales challenge is the same as it ever was”

It might be comforting to think that ‘sales is sales’ and that nothing much has really changed over the past decade or two. But it really has!  Now prospects are ‘smarter’ – they have access to richer resources of information, methods of researching and channels of communication. By the time you speak to them they’ve already done their research and are armed with a drop-box full of PDFs, a desk full of papers and a head crammed with pre-formed opinions about your company, your products and your competitors. It’s vital that you demonstrate your awareness of this fact and come to the conversation ready to ‘restart’ it at the right point so you can best understand, and serve, them.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology | Comments Off on Myth #10: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

May 19th, 2015

Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #9

“All of your prospects think like you do.”

You may sometimes find it helpful to visualize an average customer and their typical needs when honing your messaging, but never fall into the trap of thinking that all your customers fit such a simple mold. Each of your prospects has a completely different perspective, and few vendors take the time to really understand what each individual prospect is thinking about, stressed over or dreaming of. You do not have a crystal ball, or your prospect’s offices bugged (at least we hope not). It’s impossible to know the internal pressures they face, and the personal ambitions they have. Sales messaging that asks the right questions and presents authentic anecdotes will help these prospects to relate, and open up, with you.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices | Comments Off on Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

May 11th, 2015

Myth #8: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #8: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #8

“Your prospects value your customer success stories”

Do your prospects really read, believe and find great use in the case studies that you created with past customers? Prospects are more used to being marketed to than you might think, and most now have very active marketing and sales BS monitors! Steer well-clear of cookie-cut formulaic success stories that espouse the virtues of your own business. Instead create authentic, genuine stories that focus on the business benefits to customers in a broad range of industries or sectors, maximizing the chance that prospects will identify with your existing customer base.

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology | Comments Off on Myth #8: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

May 8th, 2015




dividing line Prompt Byte

The how-to newsletter from Prompt PR

dividing line


London


22 Upper Ground

Eighth Floor

London

SE1 9PD


Boston


745 Atlantic Ave

Third Floor

Boston

MA 02111


dividing line

dividing line
dividing line dividing line dividing line

dividing line

Welcome…

dividing line

Happy Friday everybody and welcome to another edition of the Prompt Byte. We hope you’ve had a great week and are ready for some new tips.

This week, we talk about ‘social’ acceptable copy, the three things to focus on while gearing up for a product launch and having a good newsletter. And don’t forget – we want to hear your Geek Speak guesses! Get in touch on Twitter.

Happy reading,

Hazel

Hazel Butters

CEO

Prompt PR

Twitter: @PromptLondon and @PromptBoston

Facebook: Prompt London and Prompt Boston

dividing line

How to
dividing line


How to think about product launches: Vision, authority and impact

At Prompt we help entrepreneurs and businesses launch products: apps, hardware, consumer technologies, innovative gadgets, business products and services, and high-end, complex enterprise products.

Many product launches are driven by a desire to increase sales. But selling your product, service or idea isn’t just about money – it’s about something much bigger than that. It’s about having an impact.

When we are talking to clients on the essential groundwork for effective communication that engages, influence (and helps to drive sales) we work on three core areas: vision, authority and impact.

Vision
This is the purpose behind the company or organization – the why, the reason for existing and the rationale for your anticipated path. In short, this is why your organization exists. It’s important to be clear on your vision, because it’s also the underlying ‘why’ for your product or service. Without a why it’s hard to have a passion. With it, all marketing and sales comes from a place of passion and belief.

Authority

Authority is about sharing your expertise – both in your market and on your product. It’s important to be an authority and consistently demonstrate it. This is why it is important to grasp opportunities to share your views, insights and advice on a market – speak with press, brief industry analysts, share expertise over social media and comment on relevant forums and blogs. Within your company you have experts, so allow them to have their expert opinions – on the market, on what prospects needs to be aware of and to ask – and to express these opinions and demonstrate their authority.

Impact

Impact is about results – not for your organization or company, but the impact your product, service or app has on your users’ lives. Impact could relate to a cause, emotional results, or tangible results such as saving time or money and increasing business efficiency. It’s about the transformation. Sharing examples, transformations and support from existing customers is a great way to help explain this impact to prospects.

Want to hear more about how to define your vision, authority and impact to drive technology sales? Then join our ‘How to drive technology sales’ webinar on May 15 – simply register here.

dividing line

App of the week
dividing line

Opinion 2


Opinion 2

Opinion Podcasting has been the free podcasting tool of choice for many for some time now. It’s a brilliant little app that allows you to create high-quality audio podcasts, then trim and edit them with natty drag & drop tools that make the whole experience fun and easy. But in its latest update, Opinion 2 has made the logical step to add online publishing and sharing options, removing the need for a third-party export service. Opinion 2 now provides your podcast with its own webpage and an RSS feed — and it’s all still free.

dividing line

App of the week
dividing line

Linux

The correct way to pronounce the name of this revolutionary open source operating system is NOT ‘line-ux’ to rhyme with ‘mine-ux’ or ‘pine-ux’. The creator of the Linux Kernel has always been very clear that his OS should be referred to as ‘Linux’ to rhyme with ‘Win-ux’, ‘Pin-ux’ or perhaps more pertinently, ‘Finn-ux’. That’s because the Finnish born software engineer is called Linus Benedict Torvalds, and in Scandinavia everybody pronounces Linus with a short ‘I’, not a long ‘I’ like Charlie Brown and Snoopy’s friend. But there’s no need to take our word for it when you can listen to the man himself explaining. The poor chap has been trying to tell everyone since 1991…

dividing line

Geek speak
dividing line


“Get a pocket computer, try to do what you used to do, yeah.”

Without the help of Google, can you identify the voice behind this quote?

Tweet us at @PromptBoston and @PromptLondon if you can.

dividing line

dividing line

dividing line

Copy corner
dividing line


Social acceptable copy

There was a time when writing for the web was considered to be a specialist skill, separate from other forms of copywriting. Content was king, but only if it was direct, pithy, succinct, short enough to fit on one screen, and compelling enough to prompt action. Webmasters and writers determined that people online were either too busy or too fickle to devote much attention span to reading tranches of text (while presumably those who preferred to read their news printed on pulped up trees had more time to fritter away digesting long features and turning pages).

Today lines have blurred considerably and pretty much all timely, consumable, disposable writing is published on the web in some form or another. This means that all content must be written with online readers in mind. It’s entirely reasonable to expect a higher degree of skipping, scanning and flicking from someone with multiple sources of information available simultaneously at their fingertips, than just one newspaper on their lap. Immediate copy writing that fits ‘above the fold’ of most computer screens is more likely to get noticed by more people. There’s still space for quality long-form copywriting online, but if anything that initial need for brevity has been compounded further by the ubiquity of small screen mobile devices and social media.

Away from more technical considerations of SEO and keywords then, are there any enduring rules of web writing that remain appropriate for social writing? We can certainly offer half a dozen quick tips that might help if you’re struggling to be heard above the hubbub:

1. Headlines must still work hard whether you are writing a 3,000 word feature or a 200 word blog post. It’s your only chance to seize a reader’s attention with big bold type and hold it for as long as you can. A clever headline is also extremely tempting and easy to forward and share without explanation

2. Only post copy that really matters to somebody, because whether your target readers are devoting 30 seconds to your piece or 30 minutes, they still need to understand clearly why you wrote it in the first place, and why they should care enough to come back for more

3. Try and make readers think ‘huh!’, or better still to utter it out loud in a cryptic way that makes other people nearby say ‘wuh?’ Copy shared is exponentially more valuable than copy swiped away, and those social media buttons are so very easy to click

4. Have faith in good copy and be patient with it. Online writing may sit on the back burner for days, or weeks, and still pick up hits and comments months or years later. Today’s copy is no longer tomorrow’s fish and chip paper

5. Be fresh, make a clear point, and ask for feedback. You’ll quickly lose trust and return visitors if you say the same old woolly things over again and never ask readers what they would like to read

6. Don’t be afraid to go long occasionally. Not everything can be explained sufficiently in 140 characters, one smartphone page, or even above the fold on a laptop screen. Never be afraid to trust your instincts and write your ideas to their natural length if you believe they need room for expression. You can always create teaser posts on your favorite social media platforms that link to the full article for those readers who trust your judgement (and have the social stamina).

dividing line

Copy corner
dividing line


Newsletters

Do you have a big email list? A small email list? Working to build an email list of any kind? No matter the you’re situation – you should absolutely be sending out e-newsletters.
Over the years, we’ve created countless newsletters for a number of clients. They’re all different lengths, different structures and are send out at different frequencies but they all wielded results.

Newsletters give you the opportunity to educate your potential, existing and past customers about your field and your company. It opens the doors for two-way communication, sparks interest and allows you to leverage existing content in new ways.

I mean, you’re reading this after all — aren’t you?

Not sure where to start? Get in touch today!

dividing line

Contact Prompt
dividing line

We hope you find our newsletter an interesting read. For any feedback on our newsletter, or to discuss how we can help you with your PR, marketing, social media/blogging initiatives, copywriting or surveys, please contact us using the details below. We are always delighted to hear from you.


London


22 Upper Ground

Eighth Floor

London

SE1 9PD


Boston


745 Atlantic Ave

Third Floor

Boston

MA 02111

info@prompt-pr.com | www.prompt-pr.com

space man
Prompt

dividing line
dividing line dividing line dividing line
dividing line dividing line

Copyright Prompt Communications 2015. All Rights Reserved.

dividing line

dividing line


Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Newsletter | Comments Off on

 

By

May 4th, 2015

Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #7

“Potential customers care about your company”

One day, when they regard you as a trusted partner, your prospects might genuinely care about your company, its position and its successes. But right now all your prospects really care about is their own success. While they will certainly want to conduct due diligence and check that you aren’t about to go bust while supporting them, most prospects really won’t care about all your successes. Endorsements may be a key part of building up authority, but the sale isn’t about your company, it’s about theirs.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology | Comments Off on Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

April 29th, 2015

Myth #6: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #6: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #6

“Prospects want loads of technical information”

Of course you need to have complete details of all the products, services, platforms and customizations you offer available on request. But there is no need to bombard prospects with complex tech details from the get-go and risk scaring them away. Sharing vast volumes of technical information, specs and customization details with prospects early in the sales cycle does not close the deal any faster, and could actually deter potential customers.

 

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology | Comments Off on Myth #6: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

April 17th, 2015

Myth #5: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #5: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #5

“Prospects love to hear from you, and listen to everything you say”

They may be prospects to you, but to other people they are employers, employees, colleagues, partners, peers, investors and more. Your prospects are busy people and are not hanging on your every word, however carefully sculpted those words might be. So don’t shout more or louder; say more interesting things and be ready to share content that interrupts and disrupts. Linking PR activities with sales wins in your communications provides the best chance to engage and excite prospects sufficiently to get the chance of a fuller conversation.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology, Technology sales | Comments Off on Myth #5: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

 


Warning: include(): http:// wrapper is disabled in the server configuration by allow_url_include=0 in /home/content/73/7998873/html/prompt-pr.com/wordpress/wp-content/themes/prompt_theme_2012/category-news.php on line 172

Warning: include(http://www.prompt-logic.com/prompt/include/footer.html): failed to open stream: no suitable wrapper could be found in /home/content/73/7998873/html/prompt-pr.com/wordpress/wp-content/themes/prompt_theme_2012/category-news.php on line 172

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'http://www.prompt-logic.com/prompt/include/footer.html' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/local/php5_6/lib/php') in /home/content/73/7998873/html/prompt-pr.com/wordpress/wp-content/themes/prompt_theme_2012/category-news.php on line 172