Go to blog home page

Posts Tagged ‘Hazel Butters’

By

May 29th, 2015

New enrollment period now open: Launch your First Crowdfunding Campaign Success Blueprint Program

New enrollment period now open: Launch your First Crowdfunding Campaign Success Blueprint Program

If you are crowdfunding, it’s important to plan and execute it as a product launch to get maximum impact and drive business (and personal) success. Let us guide you, step-by-step, with our proven 15-part part system that has helped successful rewards- and donation-based crowdfunding campaigns to raise funds from $70,000 to $215,000.

This program contains everything you need in order to plan and run a crowdfunding campaign, including: ready-made content, templates, worksheets and resources. Topic covered include how to create a plan, hone your messaging, calculate financial goals, come up with engaging rewards, work with the press, create compelling content, identify key audiences, attract supporters – and transform them to customers and fans! These are key activities to not just support your crowdfunding, but to build your future business.

Click here for more details or email us at crowd@prompt-communications.com with any questions at all.

Next enrollment opens June 8 for the program starting June 15 2015.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Crowdfunding | Comments Off on New enrollment period now open: Launch your First Crowdfunding Campaign Success Blueprint Program

 

By

May 28th, 2015

Free online event: How to drive enterprise technology sales with PR

Free online event: How to drive enterprise technology sales with PR

Are your PR efforts leading to sales? Throughout June we’ll be hosting free online events for enterprise technology marketers and entrepreneurs that want to create more leads and sales. In a 50-minute, information-packed webinar we will detail practical ways and techniques to shift PR processes to link them closer to sales and generate leads.

Hosted by Hazel Butters, who has 17 years’ of experience in technology PR and sales, ‘How to drive enterprise technology sales with PR’ will cover:

  • How to define your value proposition to increase sales
  • The ‘sales-marketing’ gap, and how to close it
  • Ten myths relating to PR and sales – and ten things you can do immediately to increase PR’s impact on your sales

Please join us and find out ways to change your approach to PR processes and to link them closer to sales. Register at: http://bit.ly/tech-PR-sales.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Events, PR Practices | Comments Off on Free online event: How to drive enterprise technology sales with PR

 

By

May 20th, 2015

Myth #10: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #10: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #10

“The sales challenge is the same as it ever was”

It might be comforting to think that ‘sales is sales’ and that nothing much has really changed over the past decade or two. But it really has!  Now prospects are ‘smarter’ – they have access to richer resources of information, methods of researching and channels of communication. By the time you speak to them they’ve already done their research and are armed with a drop-box full of PDFs, a desk full of papers and a head crammed with pre-formed opinions about your company, your products and your competitors. It’s vital that you demonstrate your awareness of this fact and come to the conversation ready to ‘restart’ it at the right point so you can best understand, and serve, them.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology | Comments Off on Myth #10: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

May 19th, 2015

Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #9

“All of your prospects think like you do.”

You may sometimes find it helpful to visualize an average customer and their typical needs when honing your messaging, but never fall into the trap of thinking that all your customers fit such a simple mold. Each of your prospects has a completely different perspective, and few vendors take the time to really understand what each individual prospect is thinking about, stressed over or dreaming of. You do not have a crystal ball, or your prospect’s offices bugged (at least we hope not). It’s impossible to know the internal pressures they face, and the personal ambitions they have. Sales messaging that asks the right questions and presents authentic anecdotes will help these prospects to relate, and open up, with you.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices | Comments Off on Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

May 11th, 2015

Myth #8: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #8: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #8

“Your prospects value your customer success stories”

Do your prospects really read, believe and find great use in the case studies that you created with past customers? Prospects are more used to being marketed to than you might think, and most now have very active marketing and sales BS monitors! Steer well-clear of cookie-cut formulaic success stories that espouse the virtues of your own business. Instead create authentic, genuine stories that focus on the business benefits to customers in a broad range of industries or sectors, maximizing the chance that prospects will identify with your existing customer base.

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology | Comments Off on Myth #8: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

May 4th, 2015

Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #7

“Potential customers care about your company”

One day, when they regard you as a trusted partner, your prospects might genuinely care about your company, its position and its successes. But right now all your prospects really care about is their own success. While they will certainly want to conduct due diligence and check that you aren’t about to go bust while supporting them, most prospects really won’t care about all your successes. Endorsements may be a key part of building up authority, but the sale isn’t about your company, it’s about theirs.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology | Comments Off on Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

April 29th, 2015

Myth #6: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #6: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #6

“Prospects want loads of technical information”

Of course you need to have complete details of all the products, services, platforms and customizations you offer available on request. But there is no need to bombard prospects with complex tech details from the get-go and risk scaring them away. Sharing vast volumes of technical information, specs and customization details with prospects early in the sales cycle does not close the deal any faster, and could actually deter potential customers.

 

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology | Comments Off on Myth #6: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

April 17th, 2015

Myth #5: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #5: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #5

“Prospects love to hear from you, and listen to everything you say”

They may be prospects to you, but to other people they are employers, employees, colleagues, partners, peers, investors and more. Your prospects are busy people and are not hanging on your every word, however carefully sculpted those words might be. So don’t shout more or louder; say more interesting things and be ready to share content that interrupts and disrupts. Linking PR activities with sales wins in your communications provides the best chance to engage and excite prospects sufficiently to get the chance of a fuller conversation.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology, Technology sales | Comments Off on Myth #5: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

April 13th, 2015

Myth #3: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #3: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #3

“Fear (FUD) is an acceptable way to engage prospects”

Fear, uncertainty and doubt – or FUD – is a well-established tactic used in sales, PR and marketing. It attempts to influence the decisions of prospects by exposing their pain-points and appealing to their predominant concerns. While prospects will always appreciate genuine empathy and understanding of the common business challenges they face, it is no longer acceptable to play the FUD card without also offering real-world, practical advice for identifying and counteracting these same issues. Your PR, messaging and sales communication should be about possibility – not fear.

Missed the previous myths? Check them out here.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology | Comments Off on Myth #3: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

April 10th, 2015

Myth #2: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #2: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success. Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #2

“Complicated technology demands complex communication.”

Nothing could be further from the truth. In order to help marketers and entrepreneurs in high-tech businesses communicate effectively and authentically with core audiences, it’s vital to create messaging that is clear, honest, uncomplicated and presents practical solutions to real-world business problems. It doesn’t matter whether you manufacture MPLS routers, secure mission-critical applications, have software that delivers phenomenal online transaction processing speeds – the simplicity of the message is not just possible, it’s essential.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Technology | Comments Off on Myth #2: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

January 29th, 2015

Make 2015 about growing (and appreciating) technology sales

Make 2015 about growing (and appreciating) technology sales

Finance concept: Growing Sales on computer keyboard backgroundI’ve worked in technology marketing for, well, a long time. I remember America Online, AltaVista, Sun Microsystems and paper press releases. I’ve written case studies by hearing IT directors enthuse about water-cooled mainframes.

I was never originally headed for a career in technology, sales or marketing. It was originally more dinosaurs and journalism. It’s funny how things work out. But fro 16 years I have worked in a business that I love covering a sector that constantly fascinates me. And yet while technology changes at break-neck speed, I sometimes find that marketing is constantly playing catch-up in order to connect more directly to sales. I understand and appreciate the value of sharing a vision, showcasing a product, demonstrating business benefits through customer case studies and testimonials. But I still feel that marketing in all its form needs to have stronger links with sales.

Some sales professionals seem to have developed a fixed perception of marketing people, and it’s fair to say there is a similarly skewed perception in the opposite direction. I’ve worked in technology sales cold-calling and loved everything about the sales process. But I think many people have an under-appreciation for sales and misguidedly think of it as pushy. I realize that sales involves, well, selling – but it’s so much more than that. It’s also about solving problems, and having the right answer for the right people at the right times. Whatever business you work for, dig deep enough and they are certain to be selling – a product, a service, a notion, a principle, or maybe just a new way to do something.

Marketing needs a much firmer foothold in sales. It should link back to sales, be tracked in relation to sales, and connect more directly with the leads and prospects which ultimately contribute to any organizations’ success. This is why we have launched PRISM, our PR and Insight Sales-based Marketing methodology. PRISM outlines steps and processes to help technology companies to target, plan and execute sales-guided marketing. While whitepapers, messaging documents, visibility, understanding, engaging influencers and securing column inches remains very valuable, for many businesses sales is the most important metric.

Want to hear some of the things that we know work? Register now for a free Friday webinar that is all about how to communicate, connect and sell: ‘Get more customers: A sales workshop for technology startups‘. Meanwhile, happy selling!

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Technology sales | Comments Off on Make 2015 about growing (and appreciating) technology sales

 

By

January 19th, 2015

Crowdfunding platforms A-Z (part one): Examples from AngelList to GoGetFunding

Crowdfunding platforms A-Z (part one): Examples from AngelList to GoGetFunding

There are thousands of crowdfunding sites out there. New ones appear every week, while others melt into the background or simply evaporate. So we thought we’d compose an alphabetical snapshot of some of the best of the current batch of platforms available. We’ve covered a wide variety of business models, including equity, reward and some original approaches for owners and backers. Come back later this week for more.

If you’d like to talk more about crowdfunding, what makes a campaign successful and to pick up hints and tips from our team, then sign up for one of our Sunday ’15 Ways to Increase your Crowdfunding Campaign Success’ webinars, which run at 11am ET/ 4pm GMT.

Meanwhile, here’s some ideas of different platforms out of the hundreds and hundreds out there:

  1. AngelList. An equity-based crowdfunding site focused on technology startups that have already raised at least $100,000 in seed funding. Contributors, aka angel investors, are accredited investors and institutions. angel.com
  1. CircleUp. Planned as one of the first JOBS Act sites this equity site handles angel investing, mostly for small businesses in the food industry or consumer products. circleup.com
  1. CrowdFunder. With a large network of accredited and angel investors, this equity-based site was a leading backer of the JOBS act. It focuses on small businesses and startup companies. crowdfunder.com
  1. CrowdRise. Helping charities raise donation funding, CrowdRise primarily helps non-profit groups dealing with issues of disease and inadequate education, as well as more personal causes. crowdrise.com
  1. CrowdSupply. If your project makes a physical, shippable product then CrowdSupply can help you raise funds via pre-orders, as well as sales in its e-commerce store once manufacture is complete. crowdsupply.com
  1. FundingCircle. A debt-based site helping small businesses looking to raise up to $500,000. It connects them with non-traditional lenders such as accredited investors seeking investment opportunities. fundingcircle.com
  1. Fundable. Another leading backer of the JOBS act, this site has a strong technology focus and uses both donation and equity models to get your campaign moving. fundable.com
  1. Fundly. This site lets you raise money for pretty much anything. Set up a custom donation web page that works on its mobile app and integrates with Facebook to help spread the social word. fundly.com
  1. Gambitious. Focused on game creation, this site requires developers to submit a business plan. Contributors can donate for perks or get equity if both they and the company are located within the EU. gambitious.com
  1. GoFundMe. This donation-based site helps you raise money for a charitable cause, or for personal campaigns such as medical bills, funeral expenses or education. It offers plenty of social media integration to help with social word-of-mouth. gofundme.com
  1. GoGetFunding. A UK-based site developed to raise donated funds for local charities and personal causes, such as medical bills or legal funds. gogetfunding.com
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Crowdfunding | Comments Off on Crowdfunding platforms A-Z (part one): Examples from AngelList to GoGetFunding