Go to blog home page

Posts Tagged ‘Technology’

By

March 10th, 2020

Security grammar: Are you insecure when writing about unsecure technology?

Security grammar: Are you insecure when writing about unsecure technology?

At Prompt we spend a lot of our days writing about technology – big data, data warehousing, BI, CRM, BPM, ERP, API – you name it, we’re ITK. If it’s got an acronym, or a set of acronyms associated with it, then we’ve written opinion pieces, whitepapers, case studies and news releases about it.

One area that’s always hot – whether the underlying topic is mobile, cloud, BYOD, SQL injections, risk or compliance – is security. Which brings us to a very specific grammar question. Do you ever find yourself pausing and asking yourself, the people around, or the grammar gods: “Is it unsecure or insecure?”

At first, this appears a very easy question. ‘Unsecure’ can surely be eliminated – after all the word doesn’t appear in either Merriam-Webster or the Oxford English Dictionary. But that doesn’t necessarily mean a great deal in the constantly changing world of tech speak. In the technology sector, words and phrases are coined and adopted at the drop of a Zune –  just consider the use of the words ‘virtualized’, ‘de-duplication’ or ‘phablets’.  At Prompt we have to stay current with the market and all of its constantly ‘evolving’ terms and phrases (but we don’t have to like ‘em).

The problem with this example is that while insecure can be used in both US and UK English to mean something that is not adequately protected – for example an ‘insecure investment’ – it is more typically used to describe a lack of emotional confidence or certainty. Yes, some dictionaries will go as far to state the example of ‘an insecure computer system’ and there’s a whole Wikipedia page on ‘Computer Insecurity’, while ‘Computer Unsecurity’ clearly does not earn a Wikipedia page at all. But for many of us ‘insecure’ just doesn’t sit very, um, securely in a sentence.

We can’t help think that an insecure computer system sounds a little self-conscious about the size of its processors, or needs a reassuring reboot up the backend. So where to go?

Well, we like to use either of the phrases ‘non-secure’ or ‘unsecured’. Both pass dictionary scrutiny, and each can be used quite literally to mean ‘not made secure’, which we think is a good fit for a computer system that hasn’t been protected with security measures.

Unless you are an absolute stickler for academic grammar (and if you are then tech buzzwords are going to destroy your finely balanced sensibilities in about a picosecond anyway), then you could arguably use any of the terms mentioned in this post to get your point across. The most important thing then, as is generally the case with most copywriting best practices, is that you are consistent. So pick a term, add it to your company style-guide, share it with your team, marketing contacts and agency – and then be secure in your decision.

Follow Hazel on Twitter at @HazelButters

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Prompt Grammar Tip, Technology | Comments Off on Security grammar: Are you insecure when writing about unsecure technology?

 

By

May 19th, 2015

Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #9

“All of your prospects think like you do.”

You may sometimes find it helpful to visualize an average customer and their typical needs when honing your messaging, but never fall into the trap of thinking that all your customers fit such a simple mold. Each of your prospects has a completely different perspective, and few vendors take the time to really understand what each individual prospect is thinking about, stressed over or dreaming of. You do not have a crystal ball, or your prospect’s offices bugged (at least we hope not). It’s impossible to know the internal pressures they face, and the personal ambitions they have. Sales messaging that asks the right questions and presents authentic anecdotes will help these prospects to relate, and open up, with you.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices | Comments Off on Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

May 4th, 2015

Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #7

“Potential customers care about your company”

One day, when they regard you as a trusted partner, your prospects might genuinely care about your company, its position and its successes. But right now all your prospects really care about is their own success. While they will certainly want to conduct due diligence and check that you aren’t about to go bust while supporting them, most prospects really won’t care about all your successes. Endorsements may be a key part of building up authority, but the sale isn’t about your company, it’s about theirs.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology | Comments Off on Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

April 29th, 2015

Myth #6: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #6: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #6

“Prospects want loads of technical information”

Of course you need to have complete details of all the products, services, platforms and customizations you offer available on request. But there is no need to bombard prospects with complex tech details from the get-go and risk scaring them away. Sharing vast volumes of technical information, specs and customization details with prospects early in the sales cycle does not close the deal any faster, and could actually deter potential customers.

 

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology | Comments Off on Myth #6: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

April 17th, 2015

Myth #5: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #5: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #5

“Prospects love to hear from you, and listen to everything you say”

They may be prospects to you, but to other people they are employers, employees, colleagues, partners, peers, investors and more. Your prospects are busy people and are not hanging on your every word, however carefully sculpted those words might be. So don’t shout more or louder; say more interesting things and be ready to share content that interrupts and disrupts. Linking PR activities with sales wins in your communications provides the best chance to engage and excite prospects sufficiently to get the chance of a fuller conversation.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in PR Practices, Technology, Technology sales | Comments Off on Myth #5: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

 

By

March 23rd, 2015

The Prompt Byte: Rising Stars – Rejjee

The Prompt Byte: Rising Stars – Rejjee

RejjeeLogo HiResWorking in technology hubs on either side of the pond, at Prompt we’re always keen to get to know more about the innovators on our doorsteps in Boston and London. Each week, we’ll interview a local startup to learn more about technology and inspiration that can be found at home.

Recently, we chatted with Gary O’Neil, founder and CEO of Rejjee – a crowd-sourced lost-and-found platform set to revolutionize the way you find and replace your most prized possessions.

1. Tell us a bit about Rejjee.

Rejjee is in a category all by itself. We register, report and then replace stolen or lost goods through the use of a smartphone application. We are the first digital platform in lost and found that brings the added bonus of matching users with replacement partners — ensuring that their lost or stolen goods will be returned to them one way or the other.

We work closely with insurance companies, law enforcement and retailers and the platform is free to use for retailers and the community. There is also a public incident-mapping feature — so you can report a stolen item in real time and alert others in the area.

Unlike other finder applications, this is not a battery-driven device vulnerable to technology or process mishaps. It is a complete free SaaS system anybody can use. You can even use Rejjee to find your lost puppy.

 

  1. What does innovation mean to you?

My partner and I started in the ad world years ago. In that world, we use the word ‘creativity.’ Creativity and innovation are two words that run parallel; but innovation goes a step further — the step of usefulness. If you can merge creativity and innovation, you have something special.

  1. Why is New England such a hotbed for innovation?

New England celebrates education beyond belief. It is a perfect place for innovation, because it is all coming out of our universities. The churn of students, professors and ideas is enormous — it drives us all.

The West Coast is sunny, but our development and innovation district is fantastic. If you were holding a light bulb as you emerged from the “T”, it feels as if it could be lit just from the energy in the air. You can’t replace that.

  1. Do you have any concerns about the New England growth and innovation culture?

The biggest problem for everybody is money. We need to build upon the investor community — angels, VCs — all of that. And you need money to drive that. You have to feed the engine, and the energy is money. Money enables creativity. The investors we’ve spoken with have provided invaluable feedback, but the fact remains that West-Coast deals have more zeros than East Coast deals. It’s the only thing holding the area back.

  1. What are some of the trends and challenges you’ve seen in the New England tech scene?

Of course, medical innovation is rooted here in New England. But, its also worth looking at what the younger generation is doing — social apps and their revenue streams.

The collaborative nature of the actual people in New England is fabulous. More collaborating is welcome by everybody in the technology community.

But, we haven’t even begun to scratch the surface of what Boston can do. The 2024 Olympics would be an excellent stage to showcase this.

  1. If you weren’t based in New England, which city and/or country would you want to be based in and why?

I would be in Key West. Of course, there is no innovation economy there … I’d just be sitting down with Jimmy Buffet, learning to love margaritas. To me, Boston is the only place to be. The churn, diversity, and the city itself is gorgeous — it has everything.

  1. If you could meet any single innovator (alive or dead) over a coffee, who would you want to meet?

Jonathan Ive from Apple.

  1. Name a piece of technology you’ve bought personally that you love — either recently or in the past — and why you bought it.

My smartphone. My MacBook Air. My Garmin multifunction display for my boat — it does everything. Though, I think the fish display is only designed to make me buy more Goldfish.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Rising Stars | Comments Off on The Prompt Byte: Rising Stars – Rejjee

 

By

March 17th, 2015

Prompt to the rescue: New crowdfunding PR packages

Prompt to the rescue: New crowdfunding PR packages

Crowdfunding can be exhilarating with ups and downs against the backdrop of constant momentum. That’s why the team here at Prompt loves working on crowdfunding journeys.

Over the years, we’ve worked on many rewards and donation-based campaigns (think Kickstarter and Indiegogo, though there are plenty of others to choose from) campaigns to help bring innovative, creative and fun products, services and offerings to new audiences. We may come out the other side of a campaign a little tired, but never worse for wear – and with even more ideas and experience.

We’ve spent a long time bringing together all of our hard-earned crowdfunding expertise and created the perfect package – the Crowdfunding Rescue PR Package. It’s a step-by-step public relations program designed specifically forcrowdfunding campaigns.

We’ll provide you with a detailed review of current communication, media and PR activities – because you can’t get anywhere without proper analysis and planning. Then we’ll get going on coaching calls, Q&A sessions and some pre-made templates to nail down messaging, content, goals, media engagement best practices and ultimately, a customized launch plan.

Intrigued? Check it out here – you won’t want to hit launch without us.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Crowdfunding | Comments Off on Prompt to the rescue: New crowdfunding PR packages

 

By

March 2nd, 2015

The Prompt Byte – Rising Stars: Riskified

The Prompt Byte – Rising Stars: Riskified

Working in technology hubs on either side of the pond, at Prompt we’re always keen to get to know more about the innovators on our doorsteps in Boston and London. Each week, we’ll interview a local startup to learn more about technology and inspiration that can be found at home.

We caught up with Andy Freedman of Riskified; a company dedicated to eliminating the security risks and inefficiencies in the world of eCommerce. The Israeli startup has recently opened a new Boston office and we’re here to find out why.

  1. Tell us a bit about what Riskified is all about and how it got started. Riskified is an end-to-end risk management solution. We help more than 2,000 eCommerce merchants to prevent online fraud by reviewing, approving and guaranteeing their orders. We launched Riskified with a goal to build the world’s best eCommerce fraud team. We stop online fraudsters and allow merchants to focus on growing their business without fear of fraud.
  1. What does innovation mean to you? 
Innovation is the ongoing process of solving real customer pain. It involves endless iteration, learning by doing, and constantly validating your product or service by maintaining an active conversation with customers.
  2. Why is Boston such a hotbed for innovation? 
As an Israeli startup opening our first US offices in Boston, there are several similarities between our two vibrant startup communities. As well as boasting a wealth of talent, Israel and Boston also share a sense of passion and pride for their local ecosystem. Each community seizes every opportunity to collaborate, rejoice in success and be vocal advocates for startups on a global scale.
  3. Do you have any concerns about Boston’s growth and innovation culture?
I think it is natural to fear that successful Boston startups will be lured away into other markets on the promise of greater exposure and financial gains. However I believe that a key driver for the incredible growth we are seeing in Boston is a shared sense of pride in making Boston a global powerhouse across a wide-range of industries.
  4. What are some of the trends and challenges you’ve seen in the Boston tech scene?
Having spent time living in both Palo Alto and Tel Aviv it has been fun to watch Boston’s emergence as a consumer technology powerhouse, alongside traditionally strong industries like SaaS, biotech and robotics. I look forward to seeing Boston continue to attract tech companies of all stages from other global communities – like Israel, Europe and Asia – and continue to expand our international reputation.
  5. If you weren’t based in Boston which city and/or country would you want to be based in and why?
I may be a bit biased but Tel Aviv, hands down. Despite the massive weather upgrade (it will be in the 70s and sunny all next week), the number of game-changing products and services being built in such a small country is inspiring to be around.
  6. Name a piece of technology you’ve bought personally that you love – either recently or in the past – and why you bought it. 
I finally started using my Cuisinart Food Processor that was given to me as a wedding present almost 4 years ago. Now I’m addicted. I’m looking for any recipes to try, so if you’re reading this and have any suggestions, I’m all ears!

To learn more about Riskified, browse their site or follow them on Twitter.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Rising Stars, Technology | Comments Off on The Prompt Byte – Rising Stars: Riskified

 

By

January 8th, 2015

The Prompt Byte: Rising stars – ARTReader

The Prompt Byte: Rising stars – ARTReader

Working in technology hubs on both side of the Atlantic, we’re always keen to know more about the innovators on our doorsteps in Boston and London. Each week in our newsletter – The Prompt Byte – we interview a local startup to learn more about technology and inspiration that can be found at home.

This week, we garnered some great insights from Mark Loughran, creator of ARTReader – an appthat will enable you to read faster, work harder and be smarter.

  1. Tell us a bit about what the app is all about and how it got started.

ARTReader was born out of the idea that digital reading could be improved. The existing speed-reading apps out there all made a strong focus on increasing Word Per Minute rates and nothing else. I wanted to see a program that was variable and responded to the changes of the user. Rather than something that improved speed, I wanted a program that simply helped the reader stay focused and engaged. By adding controls for speed and position that could be adjusted in real time, it started to take on the feel of playing a videogame as you read. Reading feels like it can be benefitted so much by data and I didn’t see it out in the market. The idea bounced around in my head and then while through hiking the Appalachian Trail I met another hiker who was interested in working with me. A year passed before we started work with the aim of creating a reading app that could help everyone. We’ve had to work remotely which has its benefits and detriments, but has been a great partnership.

  1. What does innovation mean to you?

To me innovation is simply doing the grunt work that others won’t. The risk element involved with applying resources to an idea that may or may not be profitable. Before I began I seriously considered the question of why didn’t my idea already exist? For the entrepreneur, I think there is a personal rejection of the established hypothesis. At some point all the spreadsheets and MBA’s said it wouldn’t work or wasn’t cost effective, and the innovator is the one attempting to validate a contrarian hypothesis.

  1. Why is New England such a hotbed for innovation?

Having grown up here, I think a lot of it comes from the Puritan work ethic and the winter. People in Boston know how to work hard. Between the education and financial competitiveness, you don’t find any lazy entrepreneurs, and the same goes for Angels or VC’s. A good idea doesn’t cut it in the Northeast, you need to prove you can execute. Out west there seems to be more of a prospector’s mentality, and NYC has some pretension to it. The second factor is the winter or rather the harsh high cost of living. If you don’t make it in Boston, you can’t just float, you have to keep moving. The successes of Boston’s innovative companies are usually not ground breaking, but practical, built on solid foundations and backed by sober investors. What we lack in imagination we make up for in feasibility.

  1. Do you have any concerns about New England  growth and innovation culture?

Too much a fear of making a mistake over missing out on an opportunity. This applies both to the culture at large, but on a micro level to finding talented people. I can’t blame anyone just graduating for not taking a steady paycheck right out the gate, but that’s usually the best time to try out a startup. The big companies snatch up talent and incentivize them to stay; it’s hard with a limited budget to convince talented people of taking a chance. Especially when the winter comes, no one wants to be left without heat so to speak.

  1. What are some of the trends and challenges you’ve seen in the New England tech scene?

The trends I’ve seen most recently involve the resurgence of hardware-based startups. Considering all the phenomenal engineering minds and programs out here it is to be expected, but for a few years prior it felt like all the press and attention was going towards social and healthcare. Now there’s a major focus on building things and companies that make improvements on real products. The marriage of software and hardware in its new form, the Internet of things, is going to bring some really cool innovations in the next decade

  1. If you weren’t based in New England, which city and/or country would you want to be based in and why?

Boulder, CO / Denver, CO. The culture out there is amazingly enthusiastic about changing the world both culturally and practically. The cost of living is lower, and there’s definitely a sense of secondary entrepreneurs; people who work and collectively contribute to their efforts before or after work and on the weekends. The last time I was out there, I met a group starting a business renting out a house as an office, and the cost had me jealous about my own rent. It has that early silicon feel to it, people brimming with potential. The downside was seeing how much of that energy being spent on Ping-Pong and other activities.

  1. Name a piece of technology you’ve bought personally that you love – either recently or in the past – and why you bought it.

To this day, the original iPhone I bought still feels special. The whole smart phone thing coming together in the touch screen medium, looking like a miniature monolith, made me feel like I was surfing the cultural crest of the wave. To have access to the worlds information in your hand is still having ripple effects through culture that will continue for the next 20 years. I can remember using my iPhone for the first time and really feeling like the Star Trek era had begun.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Rising Stars | Comments Off on The Prompt Byte: Rising stars – ARTReader

 

By

October 27th, 2014

Swiss startups: Start-up spirit in the Silicon Alps

Swiss startups: Start-up spirit in the Silicon Alps

Prompt’s DACH series, post #4: Swiss startups

Big bank accounts and ridiculously expensive real estate – Switzerland is known for attracting the richest of the rich. A good spot to launch a startup? When thinking of aspiring young entrepreneurs, rich in ideas but not a dime in their pockets, Switzerland is not the first place that comes to mind. But Switzerland is more than just chocolate, cheese and snow-covered mountains, it is also a hub for high-tech and medical sciences.

Silicon Alps

Support from prestigious universities such as ETH Zürich and governmental organizations such as CTI facilitates the start-up process for many ambitious entrepreneurs. This all has made Zurich the a hot spot for consumer-facing web technology: Booking platform GetYourGuide, note-taking application Memonic, GroupOn competitor DeinDeal and gaming platform Gbanga have found their way to the start-up forefront.

But it is not only the amazing scenery that makes Switzerland a great destination for young entrepreneurs and professionals – the alpine paradise offers easy setup and taxation, fast investment process and has become a great place for those in search for venture capital, R&D resources and incubation.

And not to forget: Zurich, the largest city in Switzerland, is also home to Google’s largest engineering office outside if the US, which is of great advantage for the entrepreneurial community. Swiss start-ups also benefit from the multilingual environment, they mostly operate in the country’s official languages, German, French and Italian, as well as English, which allows them to build a product in Switzerland before rolling it out to other markets.

But the dream of the ‘Silicon Alps’ has its drawbacks: The potentially high cost of living in Zurich or Geneva can make it difficult for startups to attract new talent. So it may not be a total surprise that some startups such as GetYourGuide have moved to other locations such as Berlin – and as we’ve written about in a previous post about ‘Silicon Allee’, Berlin is rapidly gaining a reputation as one of Europe’s most exciting innovation hubs.

If Switzerland’s thriving start-up community is of interest to you, make sure you follow our blog: Prompt is working with an innovative sport technology company from Lausanne that will launch on Indiegogo this week. Launch updates coming soon…

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in DACH | Comments Off on Swiss startups: Start-up spirit in the Silicon Alps

 

By

August 26th, 2014

Germany – the land of printed books?

Germany – the land of printed books?

When Gutenberg invented the printing press in 1450, it marked the start of a new era. The new invention allowed books to be easily duplicated. From now on access to the classical writings were not only limited to clergy and nobility but gradually expanded to a continuously growing audience. Now fast forward to the new millennium: The launch of the e-book about 600 years later has made printing almost obsolete; the product innovation has changed the reading habits of millions of people across the globe, in particular in America, where e-book sales have already overtaken paperback sales.DACH flags

But what about Germany, the birthplace of the printed book? According to a survey conducted by the internet platform deals.com, 93 percent of all participants stated that they still read print books, only 38 percent said that they would also read e-books. This is a relatively small percentage given the fact that 46 percent of all participants stated that they enjoyed audio books. When it comes to newspapers and magazines, Germans still prefer the print version with their morning coffee: A whopping 95 percent admitted to reading the print version.

Although e-book sales have increased by 77 percent in 2013, they only make up 1 percent of all book sales, the market research institute GfK reported. But why are German consumers so reluctant to e-books? First and foremost, it’s a cultural issue: Books are more deeply ingrained in the German way of life than elsewhere. Books and bookshops are ubiquitous in the daily life. Germans like the sound of paper and the smell of fresh ink.

Many Germans might still be reaching for the paperback for a more economic reason. The German book market is regulated by a fixed book pricing – the so called Buchpreisbindung – which requires all German booksellers to abide by the prices publishers set, so the little corner bookshop can compete with the international retail giant. In Germany, print books are exempt from the standard 19 percent value-added tax and subject to a 7 percent tax instead. E-books, however, are not exempt and are notably pricier.

Digital reading might not be as popular as in many other nations (yet), but modern devices such as smartphones and tablets definitely are. With their strive for technical innovation it is just a matter of time until technophile Germans trade in their hefty tomes for a featherweight e-book.

If you’re a German, Austrian, or Swiss company that wants to launch into the UK or US markets – or a company looking to launch and get more traction in the  DACH region, then email us at dach@prompt-pr.com.

By the way, we speak your language!

Wenn Sie ein deutsches, österreichisches oder Schweizer Unternehmen sind, dass am britischen oder US-amerikanischen Markt Fuß fassen möchte – oder ein Unternehmen, das seine Präsenz in der DACH Region ausbauen will, dann kontaktieren Sie uns doch unter dach@prompt-pr.com

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Innovation | Comments Off on Germany – the land of printed books?

 

By

August 15th, 2014

Achtung, start-up alert!

Achtung, start-up alert!

Silicon Valley was yesterday. Now say hello to Silicon Allee. Frankfurt may be Germany’s financial capital and Hamburg the country’s media hotspot, but when it comes to founding new tech start-ups Berlin is definitely the place to be.

With almost 3,000 start-ups and hundreds of millions of euros in investment, Berlin is rapidly gaining a reputation as Europe’s most exciting innovation hub. IT giants Google and Microsoft are rushing to the German capital where tech companies such as SoundCloud, ResearchGate, Wooga and 6WunderKinder have become the face of the city’s start-up success.

But why is Berlin so popular with young entrepreneurs and professionals? Certainly its comparatively cheap rents and utilities make the German capital a desirable location when choosing the right spot for a new venture. But economic reasoning alone does not drive flocks of business-savvy tech geeks to the once divided city. For many of them, Berlin is also a cultural Mecca where traditional arts meet new innovations. A hotspot of contemporary art and music, a rich variety of restaurants and an internationally acclaimed clubbing scene, the multicultural melting pot attracts young and highly educated people, providing the perfect soil for pioneering spirit and innovative ideas.

In the city once described as “poor but sexy” by its mayor Klaus Wowereit about a decade ago, tech related sales now contribute more than nine billion Euro per year. And the booming start-up scene is also bringing good news to the job market. According to McKinsey & Company, start-ups are expected to deliver more than 100,000 new jobs to the capital city by 2020.

As a native German speaker working at Prompt working for DACH-based software and for American software companies that are ramping up their PR presence in DACH, I’m really pleased to see how the region is transforming.

If you’re a German, Austrian, or Swiss company that wants to launch into the UK or US markets – or a company looking to launch and get more traction in the  DACH region, then email us at dach@prompt-pr.com.

By the way, we speak your language!

Wenn Sie ein deutsches, österreichisches oder Schweizer Unternehmen sind, dass am britischen oder US-amerikanischen Markt Fuß fassen möchte – oder ein Unternehmen, das seine Präsenz in der DACH Region ausbauen will, dann kontaktieren Sie uns doch unter dach@prompt-pr.com

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Technology | Comments Off on Achtung, start-up alert!