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May 20th, 2015

Myth #10: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #10: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #10

“The sales challenge is the same as it ever was”

It might be comforting to think that ‘sales is sales’ and that nothing much has really changed over the past decade or two. But it really has!  Now prospects are ‘smarter’ – they have access to richer resources of information, methods of researching and channels of communication. By the time you speak to them they’ve already done their research and are armed with a drop-box full of PDFs, a desk full of papers and a head crammed with pre-formed opinions about your company, your products and your competitors. It’s vital that you demonstrate your awareness of this fact and come to the conversation ready to ‘restart’ it at the right point so you can best understand, and serve, them.

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May 19th, 2015

Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #9

“All of your prospects think like you do.”

You may sometimes find it helpful to visualize an average customer and their typical needs when honing your messaging, but never fall into the trap of thinking that all your customers fit such a simple mold. Each of your prospects has a completely different perspective, and few vendors take the time to really understand what each individual prospect is thinking about, stressed over or dreaming of. You do not have a crystal ball, or your prospect’s offices bugged (at least we hope not). It’s impossible to know the internal pressures they face, and the personal ambitions they have. Sales messaging that asks the right questions and presents authentic anecdotes will help these prospects to relate, and open up, with you.

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May 11th, 2015

Myth #8: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #8: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #8

“Your prospects value your customer success stories”

Do your prospects really read, believe and find great use in the case studies that you created with past customers? Prospects are more used to being marketed to than you might think, and most now have very active marketing and sales BS monitors! Steer well-clear of cookie-cut formulaic success stories that espouse the virtues of your own business. Instead create authentic, genuine stories that focus on the business benefits to customers in a broad range of industries or sectors, maximizing the chance that prospects will identify with your existing customer base.

 

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May 4th, 2015

Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #7

“Potential customers care about your company”

One day, when they regard you as a trusted partner, your prospects might genuinely care about your company, its position and its successes. But right now all your prospects really care about is their own success. While they will certainly want to conduct due diligence and check that you aren’t about to go bust while supporting them, most prospects really won’t care about all your successes. Endorsements may be a key part of building up authority, but the sale isn’t about your company, it’s about theirs.

 

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April 29th, 2015

Myth #6: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #6: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #6

“Prospects want loads of technical information”

Of course you need to have complete details of all the products, services, platforms and customizations you offer available on request. But there is no need to bombard prospects with complex tech details from the get-go and risk scaring them away. Sharing vast volumes of technical information, specs and customization details with prospects early in the sales cycle does not close the deal any faster, and could actually deter potential customers.

 

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April 17th, 2015

Myth #5: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #5: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #5

“Prospects love to hear from you, and listen to everything you say”

They may be prospects to you, but to other people they are employers, employees, colleagues, partners, peers, investors and more. Your prospects are busy people and are not hanging on your every word, however carefully sculpted those words might be. So don’t shout more or louder; say more interesting things and be ready to share content that interrupts and disrupts. Linking PR activities with sales wins in your communications provides the best chance to engage and excite prospects sufficiently to get the chance of a fuller conversation.

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April 15th, 2015

Myth #4: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #4: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #4

“Buyers are rational and will do the right thing”

Different prospects are motivated by wildly different sets of drivers, goals and concerns. If you try to sell your products and services solely on the basis that they present logical solutions to common problems, you will inevitably fail to push the buttons of many prospects with different agendas. For years the technology sales process was purely based in ‘rational’ thinking of the flow, structure and steps that vendors believed prospects ‘should’ take to buy complex technology. Today it is smarter to influence diverse business situations with more varied, subtle and sophisticated messaging.

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April 13th, 2015

Myth #3: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #3: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #3

“Fear (FUD) is an acceptable way to engage prospects”

Fear, uncertainty and doubt – or FUD – is a well-established tactic used in sales, PR and marketing. It attempts to influence the decisions of prospects by exposing their pain-points and appealing to their predominant concerns. While prospects will always appreciate genuine empathy and understanding of the common business challenges they face, it is no longer acceptable to play the FUD card without also offering real-world, practical advice for identifying and counteracting these same issues. Your PR, messaging and sales communication should be about possibility – not fear.

Missed the previous myths? Check them out here.

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October 10th, 2012

Prompt appointed by Crimson Hexagon to drive UK public relations

Prompt appointed by Crimson Hexagon to drive UK public relations

As a transatlantic copywriting and public relations agency with offices in London, Boston and San Francisco, Prompt works with an array of clients in the technology industry – an innovative sector that is both thriving and constantly evolving.

Our latest appointment by software company Crimson Hexagon proves no different. Headquartered in Boston, MA with offices in London, Crimson Hexagon provides big data analysis software focusing on social media posts and other data sources to global organizations, including well-known companies like Microsoft and Starbucks, for insight into social sentiment and improved  business intelligence.

What is most exciting about this new client is its state-of-the-art ForSight™ platform, which was originally developed at Harvard University’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science. The platform breaks the traditional social media monitoring mold by relying on both human judgment and computer scalability. The platform currently holds an estimated 175 billion social media posts in its database, and adds an additional 1 billion posts to its database every two days.

Prompt will work on Crimson Hexagon’s UK public relations campaigns, which includes targeted media relations, opinion placement and securing editorial opportunities to support the company’s sales to B2C and B2B marketers, data specialists and business strategists.  Prompt will work on campaigns targeting marketing, business, retail, and consumer publications.

The Prompt team is looking forward to working alongside one of Fast Company’s ‘Top Ten Most Innovative Web Companies’, and has already begun working with top-name press on coverage and editorial opportunities.

For more information on Prompt’s appointment by Crimson Hexagon, read the press release here. To learn how Prompt Communications can produce the most effective communications for your sales and stakeholder value, email info@prompt-communications.com.

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April 6th, 2012

If you're in sales and you fear rejection…

If you're in sales and you fear rejection…

When I’m in ‘selling mode’ – whether it’s prospecting, cold calling, or pitching ideas for Prompt’s clients, I know it’s important to stay in the right frame of mind.  Selling is a fun, interactive process of intrigue—as long as you keep a positive mindset. My personal approach is to have mini mental rehearsals to consider what the conversation might be like, how it might unfold, which questions I should ask the person I’m selling to, and how they might respond. I then think about the ideal outcome, smile and dial (yes, it’s a cliché but it’s true), and work towards that ideal outcome.

When a call doesn’t go as you might wish, it can be very easy to blame either yourself or the person at the other end of the phone. But instead, try to really see things from their perspective. Any rejection isn’t a personal slur – they simply didn’t agree with your view that you have something they need, that’s all. (Of course if you’re trying to get someone to agree to something that isn’t in their best interest, then you’re miss-selling. In which case, you should blame yourself and go and do some more thorough research. You’re not doing yourself, the prospect or us any favours).

In a normal early-stage sales situation it is highly probable that you will get rejected. After all, if sales simply involved picking up the phone once, proposing something and hearing the person on the other end saying: “Heck, yes, count me in, where do I sign up?”, then everyone would be working in sales.

So instead, embrace the entire process: the fun of sales, the sense of achievement, earning the right to work and build a relationship with someone who was once a total stranger and overall, the fact that sales is a core business activity. As another phrase I have stuck to my wall rightly declares: “In business nothing happens until somebody sells something.”

So what are you waiting for? Smile to yourself, think what you want to say, and pick up that phone…

Hazel Butters for Prompt Communications discusses sales tips

I have this scribbled note-to-self stuck to my office wall.

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