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May 28th, 2015

Free online event: How to drive enterprise technology sales with PR

Free online event: How to drive enterprise technology sales with PR

Are your PR efforts leading to sales? Throughout June we’ll be hosting free online events for enterprise technology marketers and entrepreneurs that want to create more leads and sales. In a 50-minute, information-packed webinar we will detail practical ways and techniques to shift PR processes to link them closer to sales and generate leads.

Hosted by Hazel Butters, who has 17 years’ of experience in technology PR and sales, ‘How to drive enterprise technology sales with PR’ will cover:

  • How to define your value proposition to increase sales
  • The ‘sales-marketing’ gap, and how to close it
  • Ten myths relating to PR and sales – and ten things you can do immediately to increase PR’s impact on your sales

Please join us and find out ways to change your approach to PR processes and to link them closer to sales. Register at: http://bit.ly/tech-PR-sales.

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May 20th, 2015

Myth #10: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #10: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #10

“The sales challenge is the same as it ever was”

It might be comforting to think that ‘sales is sales’ and that nothing much has really changed over the past decade or two. But it really has!  Now prospects are ‘smarter’ – they have access to richer resources of information, methods of researching and channels of communication. By the time you speak to them they’ve already done their research and are armed with a drop-box full of PDFs, a desk full of papers and a head crammed with pre-formed opinions about your company, your products and your competitors. It’s vital that you demonstrate your awareness of this fact and come to the conversation ready to ‘restart’ it at the right point so you can best understand, and serve, them.

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May 19th, 2015

Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #9: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #9

“All of your prospects think like you do.”

You may sometimes find it helpful to visualize an average customer and their typical needs when honing your messaging, but never fall into the trap of thinking that all your customers fit such a simple mold. Each of your prospects has a completely different perspective, and few vendors take the time to really understand what each individual prospect is thinking about, stressed over or dreaming of. You do not have a crystal ball, or your prospect’s offices bugged (at least we hope not). It’s impossible to know the internal pressures they face, and the personal ambitions they have. Sales messaging that asks the right questions and presents authentic anecdotes will help these prospects to relate, and open up, with you.

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May 4th, 2015

Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

Myth #7: Prompt’s ten technology sales myths

At Prompt we know that PR complements sales to drive influence, impact, and financial success.  Our PRISM methodology delivers the steps and processes involved in planning and executing PR programs in line with sales objectives. And our free webinar series ‘How to use PR to drive sales’ shares content created specifically for technology companies. We’ve gathered this content from working with global companies including Adobe, IBM, and Oracle, and hundreds of early-stage companies. This means that we’ve covered every level of complexity, type of technology, and (we think) almost every kind of sales process.

However, in our dealings with hundreds of technology companies, we are also aware of a number of sales ‘myths’ that we believe may be holding back technology entrepreneurs and technology  marketers from making the smartest decisions for their own business futures.Over the next few weeks, we’re setting out to share ten of the most common myths – some of which may be familiar to you.

Myth #7

“Potential customers care about your company”

One day, when they regard you as a trusted partner, your prospects might genuinely care about your company, its position and its successes. But right now all your prospects really care about is their own success. While they will certainly want to conduct due diligence and check that you aren’t about to go bust while supporting them, most prospects really won’t care about all your successes. Endorsements may be a key part of building up authority, but the sale isn’t about your company, it’s about theirs.

 

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September 4th, 2013

Everyone’s a tech marketer (especially tech salespeople)

Everyone’s a tech marketer (especially tech salespeople)

A friend of mine has a great career as a bus mechanic, but nobody seems eager to do what he does for a living, or advise him on how to improve his processes. Compare that to being a tech marketer – or a marketer of any guise (I consider PR, my main discipline and daily dollar, to be a subsection of marketing). Whenever people hear what a marketer is planning, or spy marketing plans scribbled on a whiteboard, they all seem to want to get involved in some way. People voice their opinions, recall their own experiences, and dig out their red pens – it’s just human nature.

Please don’t misunderstand me, it’s not that I think input and opinions are bad things. I enjoy hearing other people’s views, and friends and colleagues who know me well will tell you that I also like to articulate my own opinions -especially on a topic that I’ve chosen to specialise in, such as technology PR; it’s a quality that makes me a good consultant. But there is a specific group that seems to get under the in-house tech marketer’s skin in a way that others can’t. No, not the competition. Not even persistent ‘pay-for-play-it’s-advertising-veiled-as-editorial’ callers. No, I’m talking about tech marketers’ own sales teams.

Time and time again, whether working in-house at software companies, running European-wide marketing campaigns, or partnering with clients from an agency standpoint, I have witnessed unsolicited input from sales get the collective hackles up across a marketing team. But why does this happen? And how can a more productive relationship be achieved?  Well, I believe there are two sides to this problem that must be resolved.

Firstly, sales people need to nurture effective marketing, because their very success – and salary – depends on it. Yes, we all know that some tech sales people are fully marketing-independent, self-sufficient, and proud of their independence. While some of that stance is admirable, it can also create a broken system and not one to boast about. Sales teams need leads – relevant and receptive individuals and businesses that are interested in the products and services being offered. So those sales teams turn to marketing for this interest to be piqued, and for strong messaging with a perfect balance of relevance and swagger (if you hate this word, think ‘market ownership’). Sales people need marketers to help them engage and connect with people they can work with. As they say, nothing happens in business until someone sells something.

And secondly, some marketers need to be a little less defensive. Marketing is a discipline that is spurred by the creation and nurturing of ideas, and so it’s bound to be just a little tempting for other people to want to, well, chip in. Whoever those people or teams are within your company with sudden interest in what you are working on, they really should be applauded and encouraged. After all, it’s no bad thing to have a sales team that is eager. A sales team that wants to see, be involved or have input into marketing should be regarded as a good thing. Just consider the alternative; a sales team that doesn’t care or want to know what marketing has in the pipeline.

What to do if you’re in technology marketing?

So, if you’re a tech marketer that wants to be open and amenable to fresh ideas, but also wants the sales team to stop looking over your shoulder, I’d advise keeping them so busy with hot leads, that they don’t have time to help. Not sure where to start?  Well, if you’re a tech startup then check out our new designed-just-for-you PR packages, or contact us via leads@prompt-communications.com to set up a call to discuss how you can increase leads / distractions for your sales team. 

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